Skip to content

Logeion

October 24, 2011

Important announcement:

Fellow Hellenists!  Stop using Perseus Tuft’s LSJ and the one at TLJ right now!  Helma Dik (one of my professors) has produced something much cooler.  The interface has much of what I like about the Perseus TLG, but it’s much prettier, will give you LSJ, Middell Liddell, and Autenrieth all on the same page, and it gives frequency-statistics and corpus-examples for particularly important words.  (And, just to bate you, will tell you if you’re looking up a word that’s in the vocabularies of an introductory textbook.)  The TLG version still has its uses — it’s based on a more up-to-date edition (i.e., one no longer in the public domain) and it’s easier to look up TLG citations in it because it numbers the entries.  But Helma is many times more awesome than the TLG people, and you should take advantage of her work.

She gave a presentation on this at the beginning of prose survey a few weeks ago, but I missed most of it because I was running in late from Sanskrit; it took me this long to find it myself.  Don’t follow me into error.

8 Comments leave one →
  1. October 24, 2011 4:57 pm

    Looks fantastic! Good for her for creating this.

  2. linebrick permalink*
    October 25, 2011 2:11 am

    WHAT IS THE MOST FREQUENT WORD– I CAN ONLY GUESS UP TO THE SECOND & THIRD MOST FREQUENT WORDS– this is a crazy website sam

    • linebrick permalink*
      October 25, 2011 2:13 am

      οκαθ ι φοθνδ ιτ ιτ᾽σ τηε δεφινιτε αρτιψλε

      • linebrick permalink*
        October 25, 2011 2:14 am

        ***okay i found it it’s the definite article

      • October 25, 2011 3:19 am

        Figures it would be the definite article. What are the second and third?

  3. linebrick permalink*
    October 25, 2011 7:10 am

    και & δε

    • October 25, 2011 7:26 am

      Denniston on καὶ(…)δὲ “This is a natural enough combination, the former particle denoting that something is added, the latter that what is added is distinct from what precedes. [Footnote: “Jebb, on S.Ph.1362, argues for the view that, in καὶ…δὲ, καὶ is the conjunction, while δὲ means ‘on the other hand’, ‘also’. This is, I think, the right explanation of most passages. But there are others (see (2) below) in which δὲ seems to be the conjunction, while καὶ means ‘also’. Here, as with other combinations, a different analysis is required in different cases.”] In Homer the particles are always juxtaposed, in later Greek always separated by an intervening word or words.” Four pages of examples and explication of various subtleties follow.

    • November 9, 2011 9:56 am

      I like that Euclid uses the definite article The Most.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: